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Swain’s Branch
of Pennsylvania Railroad, Allegany County, NY. 
The following information is researched and submitted by Richard Palmer. 

 

 Nunda News, Feb. 22, 1868 Mr. F.D. Lake is the Treasurer of our new railroad organization, ad as there will be some incidental expenses for surveying, &c., all interested in the Railroad project are requested to call and leave their mite. Lake has taken the stump in behalf of the Railroad, and holds forth daily at his Hardware Store.

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Nunda News, Jan. 13, 1872 The Railroad Notwithstanding the severe cold weather, the work is by no means stopped on our Railroad. On the contrary it is being pushed vigorously forward. The largest sharp of the force is now several miles south of the village and between that point and Angelica. Locations are selected for the work which can be most economically done during the winter season. The heavy timber work to span the road bed across the new road leading to the Station has been erected and one of the heavy stone abutments for the bridge across the lands of Mr. Simeon Hammond has been put up. A few weeks work, we are informed by one of the Directors, will complete the grading of the road in the town of Nunda. Mr. Lockhart, the new Treasurer, went to New York this week to negotiate the sale of the bonds The people of Angelica, we learn, take most of the bonds issued by that town. We do not learn that the gauge has been definitely settled upon as yet, but it is hoped by many that the gauge of the New York Central will be adopted. It is expected now that cars will be running through our village on to Angelica by the first of September next.

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Nunda News, Sat., May 11, 1872 The Railroad – How is our Money Being Expended? We stated last week that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held here on Thursday, the original crossing of the Erie in the town of Nunda. Nunda pays liberally for the road, and if there is any advantage in having the crossing in this town, instead of in the town of Grove, Nunda should have the advantage of it. The resolution which passed the Board on Thursday as rescinded on Friday morning at another meeting of the Board. The people naturally inquire if this change is made in the interest of any of the Directors of the road. Citizens of the east part of the town signed the papers for bonding with the express understanding we are told, that the crossing should be in this town. They protest against this change of route. We give voice to the expression of the taxpayers, and shall see that their interests are protected so far as possible in the construction of the road. The taxpayers of Nunda will pay $75,000 for this road. They want this money honestly and judiciously expended. The Board of Directors are the agents of the people to represent and carry out their wishes. It may be policy to make some changes in the Board of Directors at the annual meeting which occurs next month.

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 Nunda News, June 8, 1872 Railroad Meeting - Election of Directors The Railroad meeting at Mt. Morris on Tuesday, for the election of Directors for the Rochester, Nunda & Pa. R.R. resulted in the election of the old members of the Board as follows: Richardson, Lockhart and Carver of Angelica; Swain, Lake and Hill of Nunda; Wisner and Bingham of Mt. Morris; Wicker of Leicester; Root and Dow of York; Williamson of Mumford, and another gentleman of Chili, whose name we did not learn. We understand Col. Wisner is again selected as President, Mr. Samuel Swain for Vice-president and Mr. Lockhart Secretary and Treasurer. The Board is made up of good men and the officers of the Board have proved themselves qualified for their respected positions. Col. Wisner and Messrs. Lack and Swain went to Hornellsville on Wednesday to meet other members of the Board to consult with other Railroad interest in regard to the southern connections of the road. In this connection we copy from the Democrat of last week the following in regard to our railroad: "Work is in progress as rapidly as possible on our railroad, several gangs of men being employed in leveling the bed of the same between this village and the crossing, while a large number are at work, in the gully below Tuscarora. Some five gangs are doing work near Garwoods Station and from every quarter we hear encouraging words. On Wednesday a party of gentlemen from Oswego and Cortland counties representing the Midland railroad and the Lake Shore railroad, arrived in town, in company with Messrs. Dolbey's (contractors for the R., N. & Pa. R.R.) with a view of looking our railroad over, and if possible to effect arrangements, whereby they could form a connection with the R.N. & Pa. , enabling them to reach the coal fields of Pennsylvania. - The value of such connection can readily be seen and appreciated, and we sincerely trust that such may be the result of the gentlemens' visit. From this point the party will proceed south on the line of the road to Pennsylvania and into the coal regions. The Midand railroad runs from Jersey City to Oswego in this state and the Lake Shore road is an extension of the same to Rochester.

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Nunda News, July 27, 1872 The Railroad. We copy the following "official information" in regard to our railroad, from the Mt. Morris Union, it being credited to Mr. Lockhart, the Secretary and Treasurer: "Knowing that the people feel a great interest in the success of the enterprise of the Rochester, Nunda and Penn. Railroad, you will please publish the following resolution of the Board of Directors passed July 3d. On motion "Resolved, That the Company locate this road from a point at or near the Genesee river about two miles from Angelica, via Belfast, Cuba and Haskell Creek, to the state line near Millgrove in the town of Portville, Cattaraugus county, and also from a point at or near Belvidere on our present line, via Belmont, Scio, Wellsville and Willing, to a point on the state line of Pennsylvania, and that the construction of said lines be entered upon as soon as funds can be provided. "The first section of this road, forty miles, has its grading well under way between Mt. Morris and Belvidere, and twenty miles of the iron has been ordered for this section. The section between Mt. Morris and Rochester has now been put under contract to the same efficient contractors that have the first section of this road, with good prospects of having the road finished from Rochester to Angelica by the first day of January, 1873. A. Lockhart, Secretary, July 10th, 1872

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 Nunda News, July 27, 1872 The Railroad Letting We had no interest in view except to guard the interests of the taxpayers in question the letting of the contract for the construction of our road from Mt. Morris to Rochester. We were informed upon the best authority that it was not let to the lowest bidder. The terms upon which the contract was let was not then made known. Taking all things into consideration perhaps it was the best bargain the Directors could make to ensure the building of the road. We have been too earnestly in favor of the railroad to lay a straw in the way of its early successful completion, yet at the same time we shall advocate and stand by what we believe to be the interest of the taxpayers in every instance. This town and others are issuing a good many bonds which have got to be paid in cash for the sake of having a railroad. We only want our commissioners to guard the rights of the people, and issue these bonds with due caution as the taxpayers will ultimately hold them responsible.

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Buffalo Courier, Aug. 21, 1873 Railroad matters are beginning is attract renewed attention from the fact that there is a good prospect of an early connection towards Rochester. It seems that the township of Leicester, in Livingston county, refuses to bond for the Rochester, Nunda & Pennsylvania Railroad, but proposes that when the road is built they will bond. Of course the directors of the road are not willing to accept any such conditions promise, as it conveys no legal power to compel the issuing of bonds, and no one has any such conditional promise, as it conveys no legal powe to compel the issuing of bonds, and no one has any idea that they will be more willing to do so when the railroad is completed than now. The track is graded t York, where it meets the old survey line of the R. & P.C. Railroad - our road - and the directors are contemplating the abandonment of the line through Mount Morris and Nunda at York, and follow our line to Perry, to connect with the road here, and follow our track to Gainsville and thence south.

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 Nunda News, Saturday, Sept. 5, 1874

ARRIVAL OF THE ENGINE

 Great Rejoicing among the People!

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 Guns Fired, Drums Beat, Flags Wave As the Engine Screeches Down the Valley.

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The "F.D. Lake" a Screamer.

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 The arrival of the new engine for the Rochester, Nunda and Pa. R.R. in our village on Tuesday, was an important event. It had been anxiously looked for and caused much rejoicing among the people. It is from the Brooks Locomotive Works at Dunkirk, and is a fine specimen of machinery. It bears the name of "F.D. Lake" after our townsman, who has been one of the earnest energetic men in this railroad enterprise. The engine came into town about 4 P.M. on Tuesday, and as it whistled down the hillside it brought out the people in large numbers to witness the arrival of the first "iron horse" into the village of Nunda. No wonder the old settlers pricked up their ears and felt that the good time promised had at last come. Everybody was anxious to take the first ride on the locomotive. When it came into town it fairly swarmed with human beings, who had gone up to Ross' Crossing to escort it down. The engine could hardly be seen on account of the people who covered every available space from the cowcatcher to the rear of the tender. It was covered with as much livestock as a sugar barrel is with flies on a warm day. "On deck" was the veteran L.F. Paine, a resident of Nunda for nearly half a century, carrying aloft the American flag, and representing, we suppose, the "Goddess of Liberty." At least in the dim distance he might have been mistaken for this festive maiden, but as the engine approached the form was too familiar and the distinction too marked. The engine ran down two miles below the village to the end of the track now laid, finding it all in good order. About seven o'clock a martial band was put on board and all given a ridce that could get on, back and forth through town. The work of laying the track from the Shakers this way is being pushed forward, and in about two weeks we shall probably have an all rail connection from the Erie road at Ross' Crossing to the Shakers. It begins to look at last, as we hear the engine whistling, as though we actually lived in a railroad town. We hope our friends on the north at York, and on the south at Angelica, who have so persistently worked for this railroad, may also ere long hear the engine whistling through their towns. Nunda News, Sat., Sept. 12, 1874 First Railroad Excursion. The first railroad excursion over the R.N. & Pa. R.R. took place on Saturday afternoon last by invitation of Mr. F. D. Lake, who had invited some fifty ladies and gentlemen to take a ride on the engine and tender, over the twelve miles of completed road. The excursion was rather a novel one, the engine and tender being the only rolling stock used. There are some flat dirt cars on the road but these were hardly suitable. The ladies had deck the engine with flowers for the occasion, a beautiful pyramid and wreath besides several bouquets ornamented the "F.D. Lake" on this excursion trip. Boards were put across the top of the tender and these covered with blankets so that the ladies were provided with comfortable seats. The part were taken some four miles north where a large number of workmen were engaged in laying track and ballasting up the road. From this point railroad work looked lively. The run was then made back through town and nearly to Ross' crossing, and all returned safely about 5:30 p.m. The track is in very good condition and the bridges and trestle-work bear up with safety and are considered substantial. It was a good ride but most of them needed washing on their return, and will now willingly wait until passenger cars are put upon the road before taking their next excursion.

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 Nunda News, Sept. 26, 1874

 Railroad Work. About 200 men are now at work upon the railroad and he work is being pushed as fast as the finances of the company will allow. The agent of the English firm that takes the first mortgage bonds was over the road last week in order to make his report. he came a few days sooner than was anticipated as the company expected to have full twenty miles of completed road before his arrival. It lacked a few miles of this number when he made his tour of inspection but could see that the work was being pushed and that much material was on hand. He was favorably impressed with the road and the country through which i runs, and there is but little doubt that the company will soon have funds from the first mortgage bonds and then work can be pushed still faster. For every ten miles of completed road after the first twenty, the company draw $150,000. The connection having been made on the north to the Shakers, the work of laying track will now be pushed ten miles to the south towards Angelica and we hope within the course of a few weeks that the shriek of the iron horse will awaken the echoes in that village which has labored so earnestly for this enterprise. We believe it is not expected to put regular passenger trains upon the road until it is completed from Angelica to Mt. Morris and it is anticipated this will be accomplished about the 1st of November. It will be a gala day for Angelica when the shriek of the locomotive is heard through its streets.

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 Nunda News, Sept. 26, 1874

Railroad Excursion Thee will be a railroad excursion today (Saturday) to the Shakers, over the R.N. & Pa. R.R. on flat cars. The Baptist, Methodist and Presbyterian societies unite in this excursion and some from Brooks Grove and Tuscarora are expected so that there will probably be some 600 to 800 people. Seats will be arranged on the flatcars and the ride down, through the romantic county on the route will undoubtedly be quite pleasant. the contractors, Messrs. Dolby & Company, have we understand generously given up the road for this day to the excursion party, but hereafter will desire the excursionists will wait until the road is completed.

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 Nunda News, Sept. 26, 1874

 Mr. F.D. Lake has resigned his position as railroad director, and Mr. King of Chili appointed in his space.

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 Nunda News, Sept. 26, 1874

 It requires 352 30-foot rails to lay a mile of railroad track. A rail weighs about 700 pounds, and costs about 30 cents a pound, therefore each rail costs $21.

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Nunda News, Sat., Oct. 3, 1874

 First Ride on a Railroad. - In this day and age of the world there are but few persons who have been on earth for three score years, but what have taken a ride sometime in their lives on a railway train. The iron horse coming to Nunda, has awakened some of our old residents out of their Rip Van Winkle slumbers, and given them their first train ride. On Saturday Mr. Jesse Barker, an old resident of Nunda, took his first ride on a railroad, going to the Shakers with the excursion party over the Rochester, Nunda and Pennsylvania Railroad. The ride was on a flat car, on what the boys call an "Irishman's sleeper," and if he should step aboard one of the palace cars on the Erie, the change would be almost as marked as the difference between riding on a lumber wagon or aboard the flat cars.

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Nunda News, Sat., Oct. 10, 1874

 The Excursion of the Rochester Common Council over the R.N. and Pa. Railroad.

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They Vote the Remaining $50,000 to the Road.

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 The excursion of the Rochester Common Council, with other officials of the city, over the first twenty miles of the R.N. and Pa. Railroad took place on Monday . The day was splendid for such an excursion. A canvass was placed over the flat cars, seats arranged, and the train went down to the Shakers (Sonyea) with a number of the citizens of Nunda, to bring up the excursion party. The train was delayed an hour by the tender getting off the track just above the village, which gave the Rochester party an hour to look at the Shakers. There were some sixty or more of the excursionists, and their ride over the road gave them a good opportunity to see what had been done. They could witness the large outlay that had been necessary after leaving the Shakers, and expressed themselves well pleased with the condition of the road and the country through which it runs. From Tuscarora up, as the valley widened out, there was presented to them a beautiful and fertile country, and by the frequent expressions of delight by different members of the party, we judge they were well pleased with the prospect. Arriving at Nunda the party were conducted to the Nunda House, where a bountiful repast awaited them. Mr. C.D. Holmes, the proprietor, knows how to get up a good meal, and he fairly outdid himself on this occasion. The tables presented an inviting appearance to hungry men, and to the finely cooked viands they did full justice. There was everything to satisfy the appetite that could be wished for. It was unfortunate that all could not be seated at once, as it somewhat interfered with the program laid out. There was the usual speech making with toasts and responses, which occupied all time, until the train was ready to start for Ross’ Crossing. President Lockhart gave them an earnest welcome, which was responded to by Alderman Stone, who said he saw no reason why the balance of the aid from Rochester should not be granted. He believed the investment a good one, and he could now even consent to go even further to promote this good work. The road is well built, lies in a fertile and prosperous valley, and will bring wealth to Rochester. About three o’clock the party were all aboard for Ross’ Crossing, and the trip was made in a short time, the road bed being in good condition. The party disembarked and looked about, where they found a gang of men laying iron towards the south, and piles of railroad iron and other material to prosecute the work. The party were returned to Shakers in ample time to make connections with the down train to Rochester. The press of Rochester was well represented on this excursion, and the reporters have written it up in detail. The Chronicle contained a two column article, and the Express and Union about the same. We clip from the Chronicle the following favorable opinion: The trip of yesterday was a notable one in many respects. In the first place it gave the city representatives some idea of what had been done with the money appropriated in this aid, and the exhibit was completely satisfactory. Again it conveyed to their minds an idea of the great mine of wealth lying undeveloped in that region of country through which it runs, which must sooner or later find its way in the shape of travel and traffic to this city. The portion of the road already completed is as nearly perfect as could reasonably be expected, and the lower end of the line in the charge of that most competent of men – Colonel A.I. Wilcox – is being pushed forward to completion. Indeed the day is not far distant when Rochester and the hiding places of rich treasure in Pennsylvania fields will be connect with as fine a line or railway as there is in the country. And from the Express this: The trip was in every way a success, the weather being exactly right, and all the arrangements being perfected and cleverly carried out. Our common council are now well prepared to consider the question of advancing the remaining fifty thousand, and we anticipate that “the ayes have it. THE COMMON COUNCIL GRANT $50,000 At the meeting of the common council on Tuesday evening they voted to grant the remaining $50,000 to the road. We clip from the proceedings the following: Ald. Bower presented a communication from A. Lockhart, president of the Rochester, Nunda and Pennsylvania Railroad, asking that the third and last installment of $50,000 due that company to allow them to proceed with the work on the road. The certificate of the completion of the necessary ten miles of road had been forwarded to Europe, but the road would be compelled to desist work for thirty days at least to wait for funds if the installments were not paid. Ald. Bower also presented a preamble and resolution recommending the payment of the amount, to be used only for the advancement of actual work on the road. This resolution was amended by Ald. Emerson to the effect that a committee of four be appointed to act in conjunction with the treasurer in the disposition of the funds and in this shape was passed by a vote of 23 to 3. The Rochester people only want their money to be expended upon the road and not in paying old debts and in this they are right. This aid comes in good time and the skies are gradually brightening for the early completion of the 150 miles of the Rochester, Nunda & Pa. Railroad. Nunda News, Aug. 28, 1880' The Railroad Boom. There has been any quantity of railroad talk and speculation for the past week, and with so much thunder it is not unlikely that lightning will strike somewhere yet. Still it isn't best to get excited over two railroads through Nunda, just now, although indications point that way. Negotiations are pending which if fully completed, as it is now expected they will be, which will put the old road in running order. If these are perfected, that portion of the road between Sonyea and Ross' Crossing will have a train upon it within a few months. When the last spike is drove that fully completes these negotiations, the people will know it through the News. Something definite can probably be announced next week.

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 Rochester Union & Advertiser, March 20, 1882

 The machine shop on the Genesee Valley Railroad at Nunda will be removed to Mount Morris.

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 Nunda News, Sat., Oct. 28, 1882

 Passenger and freight business on the Swain branch of the Canal road is increasing daily, and the road is doing a good business now that connections at both ends are being made.

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 Nunda News, Dec. 7, 1882 Railroad Blunders.

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Nunda has made some egregious blunders in the past, as everybody concedes now. When the Erie road was built through Nunda the people took stock enough ($75,000 we believe)) to say where the location should be. It would have been located on the side hill within half a mile of the village of they had desired it. But the policy then was to keep railroads out of the villages so as not to hurt the trade. Everybody now can see what a blunder this was. Nunda Station or Dalton might have been connected with this village and the two places grown up together just as well as not. A few years after the people could see what a great mistake they had made. Later, when the town was bonded for $75,000 to build the Rochester, Nunda & Pennsylvania Railroad the people thought there could be no mistake about having a railroad if they could only get the town bonded. The road was laid out right through the village. The town delivered up its bonds but got no railroad. The people not only lost their $75,000 but more than $25,000 more in bad debt. This was blunder No. 2 which the people are paying dearly for. The next scheme was the one to raise $20,000 here to put the old road in running order from Swains to Mt. Morris after it had been sold to Chapman & Co. This fortunately failed, as the people have not got for nothing just what they were asked to pay $20,000 for. This was a narrow escape from another blunder. In about ten or fifteen years from now when people are told Nunda voted $1,000 to fight a railroad company that was building two lines of road through the town without any expense to the people, it will be considered exceedingly remarkable. But it takes all sorts of people to make a world, and Nunda is to have pretty good railroad facilities in spite of itself.

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 Nunda News, Sat., Dec. 7, 1882

 A Handsome Train of Coaches on the Canal Road - Models of Elegance and Comfort. ____ On Monday trains commenced running direct from Rochester to Swains with the new coaches provided for the road which are models of elegance and comfort. They are painted on the outside a bright straw color and are handsomely ornamented. The insides are finished in cherry and mahogany, lighted with four double center lamps, and are provided with the improved Baker car heater with automatic brakes. The seats are trimmed with bright red plus; the hat racks are of brass, and the general appearance of the coaches are luxurious and inviting. Railroad men who have inspected them assert that they are the handsomest coaches on any road in the country and beat those on Nickel Plate road. They are certainly much better and handsomer than any coaches we ever expected to see in Nunda, and attract much attention. There has been a rush for the depot on the arrival of every train, and the people of Nunda are evidently pleased and proud of their railroad. Passenger traffic opens good, and that business will constantly increase is very certain. Nunda has stood in her own light in the past in regard to railroad matters, but having seen its folly should make the best amends possible for the future. The company were disposed and intended to make this an important point on the line, and will be willing to do now all that can be reasonably asked for, if the people show a proper appreciation and manifest a desire to cooperate with them. The passenger and freight traffic can be well accommodated for this winter with the present building used as a depot, and in the spring we may expect something better. It is hoped that the mails will soon be carried over the railroad, giving more and better facilities in this way. Trains will leave Rochester: No. 34, mail, at 8:15 a.m.; No. 50, freight and passenger, at 6:25 a.m.; No. 36, Nunda accommodation, at 5:10 p.m. Leave Nunda, running northward, No. 35, at 6:00 a.m.; No. 31, mail, leave Swain's at 2:40 p.m.; No. 35, arriving here at 8:35 a.m., and No. 31 at 6:30 p.m. No. 50 runs through to Hinsdale, arriving there at 4:35 p.m. There is liable to be a change of time again soon, and hence the local columns must be consulted instead of the time tables. Freight can now be shipped direct from Rochester, Mt. Morris, and Nunda and up the Allegany Central.

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 Nunda News, Dec. 30, 1882

 Railroad Matters. Trains now stop at Fraley's on the State road, and Paine's stage runs to that point to connect with all trains. A stage will be put on from Geneseo to Piffard to connect with the Canal road, unless the Erie changes time so that connections for Geneseo can be made at Mt. Morris. The burning of the repair shops of the B., N.Y. & P. company in Buffalo last week will cause a little delay in putting on another engine and train on the Swains branch, but Supt. Patterson says it will soon be done. The railroad depot on the Canal road at Mt. Morris is spoke of as one of the best, by all who have seen it, but it is no matter than the company contemplate putting up in Nunda and elsewhere on the road at principal points. The new road to be built by this company from Rochester to Perkinsville is now to be pushed forward, a large corps of Engines having been put on the line. The heavy timber is being framed for a new trestle near the village, where it crosses the lands of Mr. S. Hammond. Nunda News, Sat., Oct. 27, 1883 An Elegant Special Railway Train On Tuesday there was an elegant special train run over the Canal road which attracted much attention along the line. The party consisted of President Hones of the B., N.Y. & P. Railroad, Messrs. Sellgman, Martin and others of the syndicate, the directors of the company, assistant to the President, Oliver Watson, and general officers of the road. The Post-Express says: At 2 o'clock, after the lunch at Teall's , on invitation of President F.S. Smith, of the Allegany Central railroad, they took their special train, composed of a Pullman sleeper, dining car, baggage car and President Jones' private car, to Portage, where they remained overnight. The object of the trip was to make a minute inspection of the several divisions of the B., N.Y. & P. road. They were accompanied by Supt. Patterson, of this division, and Train Master Randall. It was the most elegantly equipped special train that ever left this city on any railroad. Nunda News. Sat., Nov. 18, 1899 Mt. Morris Dam a Sure Thing - The Big Storage Dam Next - A New Six Mile Switch to Connect With the Railroad to Nunda Junction.

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 (From the Mt. Morris Enterprise.)

 On Tuesday, Mr. N.K. Connolly of Boonton, N.J., and M.J. Kennedy of Brooklyn, were here, and Mr. J.F. Connor, drove to Portage. Messrs. Connolly and Kennedy represent one of the largest contracting firms in the United States. They have visited the stone quarries of Portageville, Nunda, LeRoy and Canaseraga, to determine the character of the stone and at the same time ascertain the varied thickness of the layers of rock, which enter largely in determining the cost of constructing the dam. The visit to these several quarries is not simply for the building of the dam to furnish water power for the manufacturers on the race, but to find the right kind of rock for the great storage dam to be built at Mt. Morris or Portage, probably the former place - in the near future. And when built this same firm will be the contractors. These gentlemen on Tuesday, visited both sites, i.e., Portage and the Hogsback in the gorge at Mt. Morris. They say it is a plain, simple proposition of masonry to construct the storage dam and make it perfectly safe. The character of the stone found in the quarry at Canaseraga, is right for this work - exceptionally good - but has never been developed. Mr. F. Sullivan Smith, who owns or controls this quarry, will build a six mile switch to connect with the railroad that runs from Nunda Junction to Canaseraga, as soon as possible; he oes not know as he can do it in time to furnish the stone for the dam in this village From: Annual Report of the New York State Railroad Commissioners, Vol. 1, 1906, P. 19 Complaints. XXIII. In the matter of the complaint of residents of Nunda, Canaseraga and vicinity against the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as to discontinuance of train service on its Swains Branch. March 6, 1906. This complaint by residents of Nunda, Canaseraga and vicinity against the Pennsylvania Railroad Company was filed with this Board on April 27, 1904. It alleged that the Pennsylvania Railroad Company had discontinued the running of trains on the Swains branch from Nunda to Swain, a distance of six miles, to the inconvenience of the public. A copy of the complaint was sent to the company, which answered as follows: "Subsequent to April 15th, 1900, there was a freight interchange between our road and the Pittsburg, Shawmut & Northern R.R. at Swains, twice each week up to April 8th, 1904, except during short periods when the track was blockaded with snow or washed out by floods. Upon the completion of the connecting line of the P.S. & N.R.R. making a through line for them between Olean and Swains, it was found that the interchange could be made more conveniently and to better advantage at Olean and this interchange was, therefore, discontinued via the Swains Branch on April 8, 1904, and put into effect via Olean. "There is no local business on the branch between Nunda Village and Swains and the only traffic which would pass over this line is that of a 'through' nature. As stated above, the freight business which we had been handling for some time up to April 8th, 1904, via Swains, is now interchanged with the P.S. & N. R.R. at Olean, so that there is no diminution of facilities so far as relates to the freight business. "It appears that in August, 1891, a through passenger service was inaugurated between Rochester and Hornellsville, via the Swains Branch; this service being continued for about one year and then abandoned, owing to the operating expenses being more than the revenue. Early in 1892, an arrangement was made with the Rochester, Hornellsville & Lackawanna R.R. to operate the Branch, connecting with our passenger trains at Nunda Junction and this was continued until April 15, 1900, when the P.S.& N. R.R. ( the successor of the Rochester, Hornellsville & Lackawanna) gave up the operation of the Branch, as it cost them more to operate it than they were receiving in revenue. "Subsequent to that date and u p to the present time, we have been running our Rochester Division northward passenger train in the forenoon, and southward passenger train in the afternoon from Nunda Junction over the Branch as far as Nunda Village, which has been affording the people of that Village very good passenger service. Our way freight also runs to the Village each day, making connection from both the north and south. "Owing to there being no settlement between Nunda Village, and Swains and consequently no business in sight, we are clearly of the opinion that the passenger service we are performing on this Branch between Nunda Junction and Nunda Village is sufficient to meet all reasonable demands. A fair trial of the passenger service on this branch has been made twice and was abandoned owing to insufficient revenue. The fact remains that the operation of the branch has never paid, either in the freight or passenger business, and the business would be conducted at a considerable loss if we undertook to do it." A copy of this answer was sent to complainants, and after further correspondence the case was closed. (Case 3140). This statement, in the form of a letter, was written by R.L. O’Donnell, General Superintendent of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in Buffalo, N.Y., dated July 13, 1904, addressed to George W. Aldridge, Secretary, Board of Railroad Commissioners, Albany, N.Y. It was also published in the Nunda News, July 23, 1904, with this note: "The Railroad Commissioners say "such reply as you desire to make should be made within ten days." What do the residents of Nunda and Canaseraga desire to say? The News has made the inquiry as to why the Swains branch was abandoned and the company have put in their answer. It is now before the people to take such action as they choose or let the matter drop." The Klipknockie Railroad Company - Incorporated December 6th, 1899, in New York to construct and operate a standard-gauge railroad from a connection with the PS&N at or near Center Station in Birdsall Township east to the Klipknockie Quarry in Almond Township, a distance of about 7 miles. The Klipknockie Railroad Company (KRR) was organized by the same interests which owned and controlled The Pittsburg, Shawmut & Northern Railroad Company (PS&N). The route was certified by the New York State Board of Railroad Commissioners on June 6th, 1900. The KRR would have given the PS&N an on-line source of high-quality stone and riprap. Ultimately the PS&N was unable to justify the expense of building the KRR given the commercial traffic available. The Klipknockie Railroad Company’s charter was permitted to lapse in the year ended June 30th , 1907. Nunda News, June 9, 1906 (Walter B. Sanders, Editor and Publisher) It would be easy to put a motor car on the branch of the Pennsylvania from Nunda to Swains, as the track is already laid and is now unused. Such a car, it would seem, could be made to pay by running in connection with the Shawmut and Erie and connecting with the Pennsylvania here. The latter company controls the line and whether it could be induced to operate it or would allow some other company to do so, is a question. It is certainly useless and unproductive now, while it might be made productive and of great accommodation to the traveling public as the shortest route between Hornellsville and Rochester. From: New York State Railroad Commissioners Report, Vol. 1, 1906, pp. 439-444. Western New York And Pennsylvania Railway. (Operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company.) (Inspected August 21, 22 and 23, 1906.) On August 21, 22 and 23, 1906, I made an inspection of the lines of the Western New York and Pennsylvania Railway in this State and respectfully submit the following report: The Western New York and Pennsylvania Railway, ojterated by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, have in this State the following named lines of railroad: Buffalo division, including the Union Terminal Railroad in Buffalo, extends from Buffalo to the Pennsylvania State line near White House, a distance of 78.78 miles, and has 16.41 miles of second main track and 96.49 miles of sidings and yard tracks. Rochester division, extending from Rochester to Hinsdale on the main line of the Buffalo division, a distance of 98.54 miles. It has a freight branch in Rochester considered as main line extending from the Rochester yard to a connection with the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad, a distance of 2.46 miles, and another branch known as Swains branch which connects with the main line at Nunda Junction and extends to Swains on the line of the Pittsburg, Shawmut and Northern Railroad, a distance of 12 miles. The operation of trains over this branch excepting between Nunda Junction and the village of Nunda, about 2.50 miles, has been discontinued for several years. All the lines are single track. There are on this division 30.57 miles of sidings and yard tracks. The River division extends from a connection with the main line, Buffalo division, ;it Olean, to the Pennsylvania State Ifne near Wolf Rock, a distance of 38.31) miles, single track and has 47.13 miles of sidings and yard tracks. The Chautauqua division extends from the Pennsylvania State line near Clynwr to a connection with the main line, Buffalo division, in Buffalo, a distance of 85.91 miles, and has 17.66 miles of sidings and yard tracks. Roadbed. The cuts and embankments of all the lines are generally of fair width and proper slope; a few side cuts of the River division through soft shelly rock, have rather steep slopes subject to wash in times of severe storm; whenever storms occur, however, watchmen are stationed at those points. The Buffalo division has many cuts where track would be improved if better ditches were maintained. There are also a few places on the other divisions where ditches need cleaning and sub-drains would be beneficial. Bridges, Trestles, Open Culverts and Cattle Passes, Arch and Box Culverts and Iron Pipe Drains. There are no wooden bridges in the roadway. The steel and iron bridges of the Buffalo division are in good condition, excepting that many of them should be repainted to prevent injury from rust. Quite a number of new bridges have been put in since the last inspection, replacing lighter bridges and timber structures. On the Rochester Division, bridges 12, 13 and 28 are very light, but only the lighter class of motive power is used there and the bridges are to be replaced in the near future. Some of the bridges on this division also need repainting. The bridges of the River division are in first- class condition; most of them have been recently repainted and all are designed for carrying a heavier class of motive power. The bridges of the Chautauqua division are generally in good condition and well painted. The flood bridge near Irving, damaged by freshet about two years ago, has not been rebuilt as recommended. The bridge consists of four spans of deck plate girder. The south abutment and southerly pier were undermined by the freshet; the abutment settled and partially tipped forward; the pier was undermined to the extent that it settled several feet at the easterly end and now is inclined at an angle of approximately 30 degrees. Piles were driven about this masonry and timber cribbing put in supporting the girders. The abutment and pier above referred to should be promptly rebuilt and the grade at this point raised at least 2% feet to give sufficient water way, or an additional span of bridge put in. The bridge is owned jointly with the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad, and the masonry extends under the tracks of both roads, which are close alongside. There appears to be some difficulty in reconciling the ideas of the management of the two railroads as to what should be done. 1 am informed that one railroad wishes to build some masonry on top of tin- crippled masonry, while the other wishes to rebuild from the bottom. The latter method is the only proper way. The ties and guard timbers to all bridges arc of standard dimensions and are well maintained. Inside guard rails are maintained on all. The masonry is generally in good condition and repairs or renewals are being made as necessary. The overhead highway and farm bridges, both wood and iron are in good condition and all that are less than twenty-one feet above the track, are protected by warning signals. The pile and framed bent trestles, of which there yet remains a goodly number, and some quite extensive ones, are of standard construction and well maintained. Very many have been replaced with masonry and iron bridges or culverts and piling since the last inspection, and arrangements are under way for eliminating others in the same manner. Nearly all open culverts and cattle passes of the Buffalo division have good masonry, I-beam stringers and standard floors in proper repair. A few yet remain that are constructed entirely of wood. Since the last inspection very many of the wooden culverts and cattle passes have been replaced with masonry and I-beam or solid flooring. On the Rochester division a large proportion of them is constructed entirely of timber; they are also in good repair and quite a number have been eliminated in the same manner as those on the Buffalo division. All those on the River division have first-class masonry and I-beam stringers. On the Chautauqua division a great portion of those remaining are constructed entirely of timber. A large number have been eliminated by putting in masonry and solid covering and many more replaced with masonry and I-beams. The floors to all are of standard construction and in good repair. The arch and box culverts and iron pipe drains are apparently in good condition. Many iron pipes have been put in since the last inspection, replacing open culverts. Track. The cross-ties of the Buffalo and Rochester divisions are 6x7 inches, 8 feet in length and laid at the rate of 2,500 to the mile of track. Those of the Buffalo division are about 98 per cent, oak and the remainder chestnut; of the Rochester division 1(5 per cent, oak, 70 per cent, chestnut and the remainder cedar. The ties of the river division are 7x8 inches, 8% feet in length, all white oak and laid at the rate of 3,000 to the mile of track. Those of the Chautauqua division are also 7x8 inches, 8 1/2 feet in length and laid at the rate of approximately 2,5OO to the mile of track under the 85-pound rail and 3,000 to the mile of track under the lighter rail. The ties of this division are all white oak. All ties are full spiked, well-spaced and are in good condition, proper renewals having been made. Eighty-two and eighty-eight one-hundredths miles of the Buffalo division main track are laid with 85-pound, 11.71 miles with 80-pound and the remainder, 0.60 miles, with 67-pound steel rail. The 85 pound rails are connected by angle plates 34 inches in length with six bolts; the 80-pound rail by angle plates 29 inches in length with six bolts, and the 67-pound rail by angle plates 26 inches in length with four holts. The 85-pound rail is in good condition; the 80-pound rail, generally in good condition; the 67-pound rail is somewhat worn and is to be replaced as well as whatever of the 80- pound needs to be. Three and fifty-one one-hundredths miles of the main line Rochester division track is laid with 85-pound, 17.42 miles with 80-pound, 72.01 with 67-pound, 1.00 mile with 60-pound and 4.60 with 56- pound steel rail. The freight branch in Rochester is laid entirely with 56- pound steel rail. The Swains branch has 3.60 miles laid with 60-pound, 3.05 miles with 56-pound steel mil and Die remainder, 6.33 miles, with 56-pound iron rail. The portion of this line laid with iron rail is not operated. The 85-pound rail is connected by angle plates 34 inches in length and the 80-pound rail by angle plates 29 inches in length with six bolts; the 67-pound rail by angle plates 26 inches in length and all the other steel rail by angle plates 24 inches in length with four bolts. The iron rail is connected by fish plates 20 inches in length with four bolts. The 85-pound rail is in good condition and tlie 80- pound in very fair condition. A portion of the 67-pound rail is somewhat worn and some renewals are necessary. The 60 and 56-pound rail of the main line is much worn and to be replaced. The 56-pound rail of the branch track at Rochester is somewhat worn but in fair condition for the purpose used, which is transferring freight between the two railroads. The 60-pound rail on the portion of the Swains branch which is used, is much worn and should be replaced. The rail on the portion of this branch out of operation was not examined but when last examined, (four years ago) was very poor. One and five-tenths miles of the River division, main track is laid with 85- pound, 3.00 miles with 70-pound and the remainder, 33.SO miles, with 67- pound steel rail. The 85-pound rail is connected by angle plates 34 inches in length with six bolts and the other rail by angle plates 24 inches in length with four bolts. The rail is in from fair to good condition and renewals are being made as necessary. Eighty-three and ninety-one one-hundredths miles of the Chautauqua division main track is laid with 8r>-pound and the remainder, 2.00 miles, with 70-pound step] rail. The 85-pound rail is connected by angle plates 34 inches in length with six bolts and the 70- pound rail by angle plates 24 inches in length with four bolts. The 85-pound rail is in first-class condition, most of it being new; the 70-pound rail is somewhat worn and is to be replaced. There are on the Chautauqua division yet remaining two Wharton switches. All other main truck switches are split point. Rigid stands are used but there is a spring in the head rod rendering switch automatic for main track. All switch stands have well painted targets. Nearly all switch stands of the Buffalo and River divisions, and many of those of the other divisions, have high targets and in obscure place on grades there are distant signals interlocked with switch stands. Switch and semaphore lamps show red light for danger and white for safety. Green is used for caution. Nearly all main track frogs are spring rail. Derailing switches are in all the sidings connecting with the main track upon which cars are left standing where the grade defends toward the main track. Many were noted, however, where the stands lacked targets. The main tracks are ballasted with gravel and cinders in from medium to fair quantity. Considerable ballasting has been done. The alignment and surfacing of the track is very good and the outer rail on curves properly elevated. The track sections of the Buffalo division average about four miles in length and the force employed upon each consists of a foreman and four laborers; of the Rochester division, 5.50 miles in length and the force employed, one foreman and three laborers; of the River division, 5.00 miles and the force employed one foreman and four laborers; of the Chautauqua division, 5.60 miles, and the force one foreman and four laborers. Regular truck walkers are not employed but all portions of the road are patrolled daily. Each section gang is furnished with flags, lanterns and torpedoes. Alignment, Grades and Curves. The general alignment of the Buffalo division is fair; the maximum curve is 6 degrees near Ishua. The Rochester division is very crooked and the curves sharp; the maximum is 15 degrees north of Rockville. The River division is rather crooked; the maximum curve is 8 degrees near Wolf Rock. The Chautauqua division has fair alignment and most curves are light; the maximum is 6 degrees, 30 minutes near Prospect. The Buffalo division has a maximum grade of 64 feet per mile for about two miles near Lime Lake. The Rochester division has many grades and some long. The maximum is 79 feet per mile near Rockville. The River division is nearly level; the maximum grade is 18 feet per mile. The grades of the Chautauqua division' are very much broken; the road abounds in saga. The maximum grade is 79 feet per mile for about six miles in the vicinity of Prospect. Grade Crossings or Railroads. The Buffalo division crosses at grade one track of the Buffalo Creek Railroad and four tracks of the Erie Railroad at East Buffalo. The crossings are about 200 feet apart and the movements of all trains are governed by signals located on a tower about midway. The signals located on the same tower, govern the crossing of the Erie tracks by the Chautauqua division, also the crossing of the Erie by the Buffalo Creek Railroad. There are between four and five hundred movements of trains over these crossings daily and the method of signaling is of the oldest type and nothing prevents the signal tender from placing any or all of the signals at either danger or safety. This crossing should be protected by a proper interlocking plant. All trains are required to come to a full stop. Two main tracks of the Delaware. Lackawanna and Western Railroad at East Buffalo; the crossing is protected by a proper interlocking plant. One track of the Buffalo, Gardenville and Ebenezer Railway, (electric) at Indian Church Road, and another track of the same railway at Ebenezer. At neither crossing are there derails in the track of the electric road or protection over the trolley wire. Two tracks of the Terminal Railway near Ebenezer, protected by a proper interlocking plant. One track of the Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburgh Railway at Machias, protected by tilting board signal. All trains are required to come to a full stop. Two tracks of the Erie Railroad at Olean, protected by a proper interlocking plant. One track of the Olean Street Railway, (electric) on Union street, Olean. There are no derails in the track of the electric road, but a proper wire netting is over the trolley wire. Another track of the same street railway is crossed at South Olean. There are no derails in the track of the electric road or protection over the trolley wire. Another track of the same street railway at White House. There are derails in the track of the electric road nnd proper wire netting over the trolley wire. One track of the Pittsburg, Shawmut and Northern Railroad at White House, protected by a proper interlocking plant. The Rochester division crosses at grade two tracks of the Rochester Electric Railway on Plymouth avenue, Rochester. There are no derails in the track of the electric road, but a proper copper trough is over the trolley wire. One main track and two sidings of the Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburgh Railway by the brunch connecting with the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad at Rochester, protected by tilting board signal. Western New York and Pennsylvania trains come to a full stop; Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburgh trains do not if the signal is in their favor. Two tracks of the West Shore Railroad at Genesee Junction, protected bv gates and all trains come to a full stop. Two tracks of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad at Mount Morris, protected by a proper interlocking plant. The River division crosses at grade, one track of the Olean Street Railway, (electric) near Olean. There are no derails in the track of the electric road or protection over the trolley wire. One track of the Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburgh Railway and one truck of the Erie Railroad at Riverside Junction, protected by a tilting board signal and all trains are required to come to a full stop. The Chautauqua division crosses at grade, one track of the Jamestown, Chautauqua and Lake Erie Railway at Mayville, protected by a proper interlocking plant. One track of the Dunkirk and Fredonia Railroad, (electric) at Dunkirk. There are derails in the track of the electric road and the copper trough over the trolley wire is too short. One track of the Dunkirk. Allegheny Valley and Pittsburgh Railroad at Dunkirk, protected by tilting board signal and all trains are required to come to a full stop. One track of the Erie Railroad at Dunkirk, protected by tilting board signal and all trains are required to come to a full stop. One track of the Buffalo and Southwestern branch of the Erie Railroad at Blasdell, protected by tilting board signal and nil trains are required to come to a full stop. Two tracks of the Buffalo Creek Railroad at Buffalo, protected by tilting board signal and all trains are required to come to a full stop. Two tracks of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad at Buffalo. The crossing is protected by disc signals located on a tower. All trains are required to come to a full stop. The question ol the elimination of this crossing is now pending. Two main tracks and two sidings of the Erie Railroad at Buffalo, protected by signals located on a tower. This is the crossing referred to at the head of remarks concerning grade crossings. All trains are required to come to a full stop. Interlocking. Interlocking plants are maintained on the Buffalo division at {he connection of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad at Buffalo, the crossing of the Terminal Railroad at Ebenezer, the crossing of the Erie Railroad at Clean and of the Pittsburgh, Shawmut and Western Railroad at White House, governing the movements of trains at those points. On the Rochester division at the grade crossing of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad at Mount, Morris, governing the movements of trains over the crossing. There are no interlocking plants on the River division. On the Chautauqua division the only one is at the crossing of the Jamestown, Chautauqua and Lake Erie Railway at Mayville, governing the movements of trains over the crossing. Right of Way. The right of way is free from trees, brush and rubbish, with the exception that in a few places small brush is left to protect slopes. The fences are generally of wire, and while in very fair repair, a few places were noted where additional repairs are needed. Highway Crossings. The grade crossings of highways are properly graded, well planked and protected by signs of the diamond or triangular form. The signs are properly placed and fairly well painted. Brush in the vicinity of highways crossings outside of the company's right of way, has been removed where practicable. Five highway grade crossings of the Buffalo division are protected by flagmen, two by flagmen and gates and one by an electric bell. On the Rochester division, four by flagmen. On the River division, one by flagman. On the Chautauqua division, eleven by flagmen, one by flagman and gates and two by electric bells. Block System, Etc. The movements of trains on the Buffalo division north of Olean, are protected by a telegraphic block signal system, which system is planned to bs extended to other divisions. On the balance of the Buffalo division and on the other divisions, the movements of trains are governed by the telegraphic train order system; passenger trains being protected until arriving at the station in advance, and freight trains spaced and protected when considered necessary. Mile posts are maintained and whistle posts are at the prescribed distance from the highway crossings. Stations, Etc. The station buildings are in very fair repair and are clean and neat. Drinking water is furnished and time tables posted in the wailing room. Water in barrels ami fire pails is kept in the stations as protection against fire, and at some of the larger stations are fire extinguishers and hose. The station platforms are generally of gravel; some plank platforms yet remain. All are suitably maintained. The station grounds and yards are generally well kept and at some of the more important ones are small lawns with shrubs, flowers, etc. Station employees are uniformed and wear badges stating their employment. Equipment. All equipment observed was in proper condition. Passenger cars have automatic couplers and air brakes, are heated by steam and lighted with gas, oil or electric lamps. Drinking water is carried jn the cars and the emergency tools are properly located. All passenger trainmen are uniformed and wear a badge. Dining or cafe cars are run in the long distance trains. The freight equipment appears to be in poor condition. Box cars have grab irons on tin; sides and ladders on the ends; the running boards appear to be well maintained. All freight cars have automatic couplers and about 90 per cent, are equipped with air brakes. There has been added to the equipment since the last inspection, (August, 1904) four locomotives, two baggage and mail cars and 1,644 freight cars. Repairs and Improvements. Very many extensive repairs and improvements have been made since the last inspection; the principal ones noted being as follows: About 33 per cent, of the cross-ties of the Buffalo division have been renewed; 15 per cent, of the Rochester division and 20 per cent, of the other divisions. Fifteen and eighty-three one-hundredths miles of new 85-pound steel rail has been laid on the Buffalo division replacing worn 80 and 67-pound rail. Three and five- tenths miles of second use 85-pound. 17.40 miles of 80- pound and 2.50 miles of 67-pound rail on the Rochester division, replacing worn 67, 60 and 56-pound rail. Three miles of 70-pound rail on the River division replacing worn 67-pound rail. Twenty-five and ninety-one one hundredths miles of new 85- pound rail on the Chautauqua division, replacing worn 70 and 67-pound rail. Ten and two-tenths miles of main track, Buffalo division, have been ballasted with gravel, 13.25 miles with cinders. Fifty-eight and fifty one- hundredths miles of main track of the Rochester division with gravel and 1.02 miles with cinders. Twenty and one- fourth miles of the River division has been ballasted with gravel and five miles with cinders. Sixteen miles of the Chautauqua division with gravel and 4.00 miles with cinders. Quite an amount of gravel ballast is now distributed on this division ready to put in track. Two light iron bridges of the Buffalo division and one of the River division have been replaced with stronger structures. Two iron structures of the Rochester division and one of the River division replaced with iron pipe and filling and two of the Rochester division with concrete culverts and filling. Two trestles of the Rochester division and two of the Chautauqua division have been rebuilt. One trestle of the Buffalo division and one of the Rochester division replaced with iron bridges. Two trestles of the Buffalo division and five of the Chautauqua division replaced with concrete culverts and filling. Three trestles of the Buffalo division have been extensively repaired; lighter repairs to others on the different divisions. Two open culverts and cattle passes of the Buffalo division, three of the Rochester division and one of the Chautauqua division, rebuilt. Six wooden culverts and cattle passes of the Buffalo division replaced with masonry and I-beams. Two cattle passes of the Buffalo division and thirteen of the Chautauqua division filled. Four culverts and on the passes of the Rochester division have had timber structures replaced with I-beams. Extensive repairs have been made to the ties and guard timbers of bridges, open culverts and cattle passes and a large number entirely replaced. Necessary repairs have been made to station and other buildings and a number of minor buildings, water tanks, etc. constructed. Twenty-seven iron structures of the Buffalo division, eleven of the Rochester division and ten of the River division have been repainted. Twenty-five and fifty-one one hundredths miles of fence of the Buffalo division has been rebuilt and 91.00 miles repaired. Seven miles of the Rochester division rebuilt and 26.00 miles repaired. One mile of the River division rebuilt and 2.51 miles repaired. Sixteen and seventy-five one-hundredths miles of the Chautauqua division rebuilt and 23.00 miles repaired. Considerable addition has been made to tracks in the various yards some new passing tracks constructed and others extended. Recommendations. That the ditches be cleaned where necessary; that the remainder of the bridges where paint is poor repainted; that the flood bridge on the Chautauqua division near Irving, have the south abutment and southerly pier rebuilt; the other masonry and bridge raised at least two and one-half feet or an additional span put in to provide sufficient water way; that necessary renewal of rail, as indicated in above report, be made; that all stands of derailing switches be provided with targets; that a proper interlocking plant be put in at the crossing of the Erie Railroad in Buffalo and that necessary repair- be made to fences. A copy of this report was sent to the company with a letter making the recommendations in the report the recommendations of this Board. The company replied, stating that the ditches would be cleaned wherever necessary; that the bridges would be painted and the work completed in the coming year. '' With reference to rebuilding of piers and trestles, and raising our bridge No. 23, Dead Creek * * *, this is a joint bridge and it takes the action not only of our company, but, also, that of the New York, Chicago and St. Louis R. R. Co. We have this matter under consideration just now and will push it to a rapid conclusion. All the light rail will be removed from our tracks as rapidly as conditions will warrant. With reference to the present system of signaling at the crossing of the Erie R. R. at Buffalo, a modern plant is being considered by all parties concerned and a satisfactory conclusion is hoped for at an early date. We have arranged to make repairs to fences wherever needed. (No. 17 —1906.)

TPL_BEEZ2_ADDITIONAL_INFORMATION